Twelve months of experiments: January 2018

When last I wrote, dear readers, I’d cliffhangered you at the end of the first of what’s likely to be an exhaustive series on how my first-ever request for a raise goes. I regret to inform you that today’s post is not a continuation of that series, which is something you’d probably surmised from the title.

Instead, since it’s a new month (also my birthday month! I suppose turning 26 means my quarter-life crisis will be over, right?), here’s an end of month update on the challenges I took on in January. I was decluttering, doing a no-spend/uber frugal month challenge, a barre challenge, and still trying to meditate every day.

In case that sounds like an overwhelming number of things to do all at once, may I remind you how the last bit of my first post of 2018, which laid out the four challenges I was doing, ended?

Ridiculously overly ambitious? We shall see!

In a surprise to absolutely no one, turned out it was ridiculously overly ambitious! Continue reading “Twelve months of experiments: January 2018”

How the library is helping me reach financial independence (guest post on Millennial Money Man)

Surprise, everyone! It’s Wednesday, not Thursday, so why are you hearing from me today instead of tomorrow?

It’s because I’ve got exciting news: I’ve got a guest post over on Millennial Money Man today!

Just in case the title didn’t give the topic away, here’s how the post starts: “I’m a huge nerd and a voracious reader. I always have been, always will be.” Surprise again, I wrote a post about libraries! Continue reading “How the library is helping me reach financial independence (guest post on Millennial Money Man)”

Five things I don’t regret spending money on

Hey, everyone. This post is currently competing in the second round of the Rockstar Rumble. If you could head over here and vote (I’m “Regret” in Game 32), I’d be grateful!

I spend a lot of time on this blog talking about ways I’m saving money or things I’m no longer spending money on. It’s a function both of being on the FIRE path and also just a fact of life for someone on a non-profit salary. There’s lots of talk in the personal finance community of how to save money, ranging from small things like lattes to the big things like houses and cars.

But saving money isn’t the whole story—sometimes there are times when it makes more sense to spend money than not to spend it.  I’m a broken record when it comes to talking about why I spend so much money each month on my barre membership. But here are five not-so-obvious larger-ticket items I’m glad I’ve spent money on. Continue reading “Five things I don’t regret spending money on”